J.me

Is an entry-level DAC/AMP worth an upgrade? A FiiO Q1 casual review

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I have never been an audiophile myself, although I love to own a good pair of headphones, I didn’t worry much about my setup. My personal belief is that to upgrade audio quality, a good pair of headphones is a lot more important than anything else. Of course, a good source is important, but I’m also in the camp that couldn’t distinguish a lossless file with a good compressed one (iTunes AAC files for example, is generally good).

But I have always been curious how a separate DAC/AMP could do to improve my setup. Is it worth upgrading over the on-board sound from my setup? So FiiO recently released Q1, an entry-level ($69.99) portable DAC/Amp and I decided to give it a test myself.

Attack on Titan part 1 live action movie impression

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Live action adaptation of a manga can be a hit or miss. To be fair, I have only watched a handful of live action adaptation in recent years, some were pretty good with notable example being Death Note and Samurai X, while some were complete disaster (Dragon Ball Hollywood adaptation anyone?).

This week, Attack on Titan part 1 began its screening in Indonesian theatres and I have just returned from watching it, and so decided to write my impression. I’m a pretty big fan of the original manga from Hajime Isayama, although I watched just a couple of episodes of the anime adaptation. The live action Attack on Titan movie, however, is a loose adaptation of the original storyline. Some characters is featured and important plot point is still there. Although if you are a fan of the original manga, you will notice something is just out of place, odd and some of the story is just cringeworthy. Below is my take of the first of the two part movies. Obviously while I won’t spoil the important part of the movie, consider yourself warned of reading some spoilers.

3DS Review: Iron Combat: War in the Air

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Developed by Amzy and recently published by Teyon in North America, Iron Combat: War in the Air is an action shoot-em-up game. In this game, we control a next-gen mecha-girl that can transform into plane at will. Both mode offers a distinct control, with their own advantage and disadvantage.

The game is split into multiple missions. In story mode, we have to complete 16 missions to reach the ending, the missions then split into two paths. In total, the whole game offers 20 missions. Some mission have boss, while some is simply wiping every enemies you found. The boss can be a huge battleship or Ratel, a next-gen unit like the character we control, which we encounter multiple times throughout the story. Everything sounds promising, but could the game can live up to it’s premise?

In defense of the Apple new Macbook

On it’s  Spring Forward event, Apple announced a shiny new Macbook with 12 inches retina display, which surprisingly become a new lineup than replacing the Macbook Air line, contrary to the previous rumour. Beside the odd naming (how Macbook is supposed to be thinner and lighter than a Macbook Air?), the new machine is quite exciting. And Apple is quite ambitious that they believe they reinvented the notebook.

Unfortunately, after the unveil, it looks like the machine get more negativity than positivity. I, however, beg to differ and would contribute to the positivity of this machine. Although the machine is not for everyone now, as there is a lot of sacrifice to make, but I can see in future that this might be common in all notebooks, it just start with the new Macbook.

So from what I see, there’s at least three major complains over the new Macbook: limited Core M processor, unified single USB Type-C port and the pricing. All of them are valid complains of course, but is it really that bad?

5 Chrome extensions that I couldn’t live without

Launched back in 2008, Chrome has been my favorite browser since it’s inception. At that time, a bloated toolbars is something common in desktop browser, even if we tries to minimalize them, they still took a precious space on our screen. When Chrome arrived with the simple and clean UI, it immediately become my primary browser. It’s also faster and stable, and thanks to the multi-process architecture, I never have to worry to crash my browser when one tab is not responsive.

Although, sadly, one thing I have to let go when migrating from Firefox is the ability to run third-party extension. So I still find myself going back and forth with Firefox. It’s not until 2010 that Google added extension support to Chrome, and since then I can finally make Chrome my primary browser without looking back at the others (except when I do testing of course). 🙂

Now, I’m going to list my 5 favorite Chrome extensions that I couldn’t imagine to live without them. Here I go.

Refreshing blog, new design and new domain

It has been a while since the last time I change the design of this blog, it is almost three years ago. The web landscape has been changed rapidly since then, with HTML5 becoming more standard and CSS3 is more supported, that made my old design outdated. So the thought came to me, it is the time for a new design.

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Also with this opportunity, I also introduced a new domain for this blog, jeffri.me. Starting today, jeffri.me is the default domain for this blog, while my old domain – jeffri.net – will redirect to this new domain. In case you are wondering, why did I change a dot net to dot me, well, no specific reason. I just feel like it, it’s shorter by one letter and it’s more personal.  🙂 Besides, it’s not like my old domain ranked high, although it’s 5 years old now. I will keep jeffri.net for as long as I live though.

Responsive layout testing

While working on a responsive website, testing it could be tricky. The usual way (and effective) is to resize the browser window and there’s many plugins on the browser that do just that. Another way is to use an available tools on the web, many of these are awesome, like The Responsinator and Screenqueri.es. Another one that is also my favorite is RWD Bookmarklet by Victor Coulon.

These were all cool and I frequently used it. However, these tools were made for testing on mobile and tablet display resolution, what if, you want to test a laptop or desktop resolution as well? In my case, I have 1280×800 laptop, so I never knew how the website will look on higher resolution screen. There’s also many display resolution on mobile now to consider, not just iOS resolution.

And so I created a simple tool to test responsive website, with a wide range of resolution to select, from mobile to tablet to desktop. Also HDPI display is common now, so I added a device pixel ratio selection that calculate the effective resolution. For example, Motorola RAZR have QHD display with pixel ratio of 1.5, so the effective resolution is actually 640×360, that is the resolution the phone display on it’s browser.

Feel free to use the tool here: responsive.jeffri.net

A little bit of disclaimer, I don’t store any data from your usage. There’s no trip to the server when you use it, at all. 🙂

Hope you find it useful! Cheers!

Pure CSS3 responsive navigation with :target

This is an experiment I tried when working on WPMUDEV mobile navigation a while back, basically to make the navigation work with CSS alone. Using :target pseudo-class, this is possible, but of course it won’t work very well on every navigation.

For the sake of this demonstration, I have made a responsive navigation that will scale between smartphone, tablet and desktop.

Background image on table row

Applying a background image on table row is a classic issue that never get right, at least not in a first few pages on Google search when I looked on a solution. In fact, the only cross browser solution is to apply the background to the table cells instead. But what happen if you want a repeated background across the table row?

The problem

Let’s say you wanted to apply a background to a row that has disabled class.

The CSS:

table tr.disabled {
	background: url('disabled.png') repeat-x;
	color: #aaa;
}

Result:

Ouch! The background is in fact applied to the table cell, not the table row as we intended. It looks ugly as the image start in every cell!

Cleaning MSI GX633 Fan

My current notebook, MSI GX633 turned 2 years old by this March. In past months, the notebook run pretty hot that it’s not even possible to run everything at maximum. A more intense task like video playback would raise the temperature to more than 90 degrees Celcius. I can’t even use the maximum clock (the processor run at 550 Mhz, 1.1 Ghz and 2.2 Ghz), so I’m limiting it to the middle clock, and even so it still heat that much.

I have tried a few solutions to solve this overheating issue, first is undervolting. It’s kind of challenge to find which tools that can undervolt AMD Turion X2 processor, and I found K40Stat worked for me. I was hoping this could solve the overheating, but it’s not. I always get BSOD at the end. The next solution I tried is buying a laptop cooler (opted for Targus model), but it didn’t help much either. In the end, I could only run half the clock of the processor to prevent it from overheat.

In general, overheating is caused by accumulated dust on the air intake and outtake, blocking off the ventilation. Even though the solution is simple, by cleaning the fan and the ventilation, but it require me to open the notebook cover. Since this is my only work computer, I’m always avoiding this but I finally build up the courage to do it as the heat is unbearable anymore. Read on to find out how I clean my fan and solve the overheating issue. 🙂